Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Legislator Assists with Storm Relief in Texas

Representative Ryan Yamane (Mililani, Waipio Gentry, Waikele), along with seven other Hawaii Red Cross volunteers have deployed to Texas to assist with recovery efforts following June 16th's Tropical Storm Bill, which struck the Texas coastline amidst the aftermath of Texas' severe flooding in May.

The May flooding in the Lone Star State has affected thousands of homes and displaced countless residents. About 2,000 Red Cross workers have been on the ground helping for weeks, providing thousands of shelter stays in more than 50 shelters, serving more than 242,000 meals and snacks, and distributing more than 130,000 relief supplies. They also have been providing health services such as replacing lost eyeglasses and medications and providing emotional support to those affected.

As a licensed social worker, Rep. Yamane serves as a Disaster Mental Health Services volunteer and will deliver specialized disaster counseling to victims and relief workers as they deal with the trauma and stresses of their situation. As a Disaster Mental Health Services provider, Rep. Yamane is tasked with addressing the physical needs of victims; reconnecting them with friends, family, and social support networks; and providing emotional comfort and support to help individuals focus on their disaster-related needs. He has been a volunteer with the Hawaii Red Cross since 2002.

How to Help. A donation to Red Cross Disaster Relief can help provide food, water and shelter for someone who has to leave their home. Help people affected by disasters like floods, storms and countless other crises by making a gift to Red Cross Disaster Relief. Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small. To donate, people can visit www.redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or text REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

Friday, May 22, 2015

Sakada Day to Honor Hawaii's Filipino Heritage

In events at the Capitol before an overflow crowd, Governor Ige held signing ceremony for HB604, which establishes December 20 of each year as ‘Sakada Day’ in Hawaii. The bill recognizes the Filipino community’s contribution to the history, economy, culture and heritage of Hawaii. The measure was introduced by Rep. John Mizuno (Kalihi Valley, Kamehameha Heights, Lower Kalihi) with 18 other legislators, at the urging of Consul General Gina Jamoralin of the Philippine Consulate General in Honolulu.

“Like many moments in history, the arrival of the first 15 sakadas in Hawaii occurred little noticed by most in Hawaii at the time,” said Mizuno. “However, after viewing their struggles and sacrifices we are honored to recognize the first migration of Filipinos in Hawaii and the sakadas that followed as we appreciate their historic importance and significance to shaping Hawaii. Today Filipinos have achieved significant success worldwide, however in moving forward it is important to remember the great pioneers who paved the way which allowed for such success to occur. After reviewing the legacy of the sakada we truly begin to understand all that it represents and means to all of us in the state.”

“On behalf of the Philippine government and the Filipino community in Hawaii, I want to express my deepest thanks to Governor Ige and the members of the Hawaii State Legislature for this great gift for the Filipino people,” said Consul General Jamoralin. “I hope this milestone act, honoring the arrival of the first 15 sakadas in Hawaii will inspire future generations of Filipinos to take pride in their heritage.”

The sakadas, or Filipino plantation workers, were the first Filipinos to arrive in Honolulu aboard the S.S. Doric more than 100 years ago on December 20, 1906, to work as contract laborers in the plantation industry. About 120,000 sakadas arrived in Hawaii between 1906 and 1934. These sakadas paved the way for the legacy that would be built by the Filipino community in Hawaii and worldwide.

Today, Filipinos make up the second largest ethnic group in the state, with Filipinos in leadership positions in business, government, community service organizations and the professions.

Friday, May 8, 2015

Kauai Lawmakers Ensure Over $93 million in CIP for Kauai

With the close of the 2015 legislative session, Kauai legislators secured over $93 million in Capital Improvement Project (CIP) funding for various projects across the island. The largest amount was provided for highway improvements throughout Kauai. These roadway improvements will address aging infrastructure, improve existing operations, establish additional safety measures, and mitigate the effects of traffic constrictions.

“The upkeep of our roads and highways are a constant challenge and CIP funding are at the heart of our efforts to keep our island’s residents safe while supporting economic growth,” said Representative Dee Morikawa (Niihau, Lehua, Waimea, Koloa). “I'm especially pleased that we were able to fulfill the student driven initiative to provide a new covered play court for the students of Waimea Canyon Middle School."

“These funds are very important for Kauai and especially for the small, and often isolated, communities that make up the island,” said Representative James K. Tokioka (Wailua, Homesteads, Hanamaulu, Lihue, Puhi, Old Koloa Town, Omao). “I’m pleased that the Legislature was able to take stock of what our people’s needs are and respond appropriately.”

“Economic recovery on Kauai has lagged somewhat behind the other islands and so these infrastructural resources will help us catch up with the rest of the state,” said Representative Derek S.K. Kawakami (Hanalei, Princeville, Kilauea, Anahola, Kapaa, Wailua).

“The CIP funding will help address a variety of important concerns and needs on Kauai and I’m pleased that the community will receive the benefits of these projects not just for now, but for years to come,” said Senate President Ron Kouchi (Kauai, Niihau), who managed the CIP discussions on behalf of the Senate.
 
Notable CIP funding highlights for Kauai include:
  • $2.5 million for design, construction and equipment to provide photovoltaic power for Kauai Community College
  • $1.5 million for an outdoor play court for Waimea Canyon Middle School
  • $500,000 to construct a new Waimea River concrete ford crossing
  • $500,000 for improvements to Waiakea Canal Boat Ramp
  • $4.45 million for the Hanapepe/Eleele transmission waterline improvement project
  • $400,000 for renovations to the Kauai Veterans Cemetery Pavilion
  • $3.05 million for Moloaa well and post-harvest facility project
  • $2.1 million for construction and equipment for Motorola 800 MHZ upgrade Phase III of public safety communications infrastructure
  • $1.5 million for the third phase construction of sheltered bus stops along highways
  • $20 million for the construction of various airfield improvements at Lihue Airport
  • $4.3 million for guardrail and shoulder improvements on state highways on Kauai
  • $10.6 million for land acquisition and improvements to Kuhio Highway in the vicinity of Kauai Community Correctional Center and Wailua Golf course
  • $23 million for land acquisition, design and construction of a new Kapaa bypass and to widen sections of Kuhio Highway
  • $750,000 for rehabilitation and/or replacement for Kapaia Stream Bridge, Kuhio Highway
  • $15 million for replacement of Wainiha bridges 1, 2 and 3 along Kuhio Highway
  • $100,000 for land acquisition for rehabilitation of Bridge 7E along Kaumualii Highway
  • $600,000 for land acquisition and rehabilitation of Waioli Stream, Waipa Stream and Waikoko Stream bridges along Kuhio Highway
  • $150,000 for slope stabilization at Lumahai Hillside, Kuhio Highway
  • $1.35 million for Kaumualii Highway improvements and rehabilitation
  • $1.624 million for the plans and design of the Hanahanapuni Firing Range

In addition to the executive budget CIP funding, appropriations for Grants-In-Aid were also awarded to organizations for the benefit of the Kauai community:
  • $513,559 to Kauai Economic Opportunity, Inc. for installation of photovoltaic systems
  • $50,000 to Supporting the Language of Kauai, Inc. for a multi-purpose community facility
  • $87,400 to Ho’omana, Inc. for renovations to its training center facility
  • $120,422 to the Kauai Food Bank for its Keiki CafĂ© Community Assistance Program
  • $123,203 to Kauai Planning & Action Alliance, Inc. to improve the outcomes for Kauai youth through training and education
  • $500,000 to Kauai Economic Development Board for the plans and construction of the new Kauai Creative Technology Center
  • $156,765 to Kauai Economic Opportunity, Inc. to assist homeless achieve self-sufficiency and to promote permanent housing solutions
For more information, please contact:

Representative Derek Kawakami (Hanalei, Princeville, Kilauea, Anahola, Kapaa, Wailua)
(808) 586-8435
repkawakami@capitol.hawaii.gov

Representative James Tokioka (Wailua Homesteads, Hanamaulu, Lihue, Puhi, Old Koloa Town)
(808) 586-6270
reptokioka@capitol.hawaii.gov

Representative Dee Morikawa (Niihau, Lehua, Waimea, Koloa)
(808) 586-6280
repmorikawa@capitol.hawaii.gov

Senator Ronald D. Kouchi (Kauai, Niihau)
(808) 586-6030
senkouchi@capitol.hawaii.gov

Thursday, May 7, 2015

2015 Session Closing Remarks by Speaker Joseph M. Souki

CLOSING REMARKS
2015 REGULAR SESSION
JOSEPH M. SOUKI
SPEAKER, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVE
HOUSE CHAMBERS, STATE CAPITOL
THURSDAY, MAY 7, 2015

We adjourn today sine die. And yet we all understand that our work is not yet done; that it continues on quietly beyond the limelight.

From our transportation infrastructure to healthcare, you took on the challenges, even when there seemed to be little hope for success.

First steps are always awkward and seemingly small.

Building Honolulu’s rail system has been frustrating. The little distance traveled for the price seems high indeed. But the cost for not taking this first step is even higher, and future generations will thank you for your far sightedness and courage.

And they will also thank you for thinking outside the box to resolve Maui Hospital’s financial crisis. Good solutions are always collaborative and identified, not by one person’s signature, but by many fingerprints. Together with the Governor, we’ve come up with a fair resolution for all concerned, including the people of Maui.

You also took steps to complete the job of preserving the lands around Kawela Bay for future generations—a task that seemed daunting a year ago. You not only completed that job but re-fashioned a better deal that looked out for the best interest of the people of Hawaii.

During this session, as the Hawaii Health Connector ramped up from its slow start, you moved to ensure its viability. The seamless integration of the Affordable Care Act into our landmark prepaid healthcare is key to ensuring the future health of all of our citizens. You took measures to protect Hawaii’s Prepaid Health Care Act, the bedrock of our people’s healthcare infrastructure.

You also heard the pleas of those who depend on medical marijuana to make it through each day and provided them with legal access to dispensaries throughout the state.

Education is the key to lifelong success. Knowing this, you invested heavily in our schools, from early learning to higher education.

You gave children who are at risk a chance to go to preschool and gave them a leg up in succeeding in their schooling and in their lives. At the same time, you provide the University of Hawaii with the fiscal flexibility to better support its students and campuses throughout the state.

For those who need a helping hand, you provided more than $28 million in grant-in-aid for nonprofit organizations who reach out to the community with invaluable services.

In addition, you provided over $2.45 billion for a wide range of capital improvement projects for our infrastructure, which will continue to support state services and economic growth on all islands.

As we move further from the last economic recession, it becomes easier to slip into past practices of borrowing from the state’s Rainy Day Fund and the Hurricane Relief Fund, and spend more freely during good times.

You not only refrained from that temptation but continued to address the state’s unfunded liabilities in a responsible and prudent manner.

Together, with the Senate and the Ige administration, we did all this and more. We did it not to make headlines, but to make Hawaii the kind of place we are all proud to call home.

We did it for our families and our communities.

We did it for the poor and the frail.

We did it for today’s kupuna and tomorrow’s keiki.

We did it for Hawaii.

To the leadership team, the chairs, vice chairs, and every member of the House, thank you for your unwavering commitment to do your best for the people of Hawaii.

Because of you, this was not only a productive session but a good start on the biennium marked by significant accomplishments.

I would like to especially thank Majority Leader Scott Saiki, Vice Speaker John Mizuno, Majority Floor Leader Cindy Evans and Finance Chair Sylvia Luke for their tremendous contributions and tireless efforts in moving us forward to this day.

To our minority leader, Beth Fukumoto Chang, and the Minority Caucus, thank you for bringing your constructive ideas and perspectives to the table.

To the permanent and session staff of the House, thank you for your professionalism and tireless efforts in supporting the work of the House.

I would also like to thank former Senate President Donna Kim, her leadership team, the senate chairs and members who worked with us and collaborated as we worked to craft legislation for the people of Hawaii.

Again, I am deeply grateful to all of you for your trust, your hard work and commitment to the people of Hawaii.

One final thought: the Speaker’s closing remarks are rightfully about what we accomplished during the session. Rarely, is it about bills that did not make it through the rigorous process of lawmaking.

We all know the amount of work that goes into shepherding a bill through this legislative process. We all know how much sweat equity we pour into it.

When a bill dies, especially in the eleventh hour, we sometimes feel like a part of ourselves died with it. When it fails, we feel like we’ve failed.

But the real truth is you haven’t.

If we only took on issues that we knew would succeed, Hawaii would be a poorer society because of it.

We are richer, when there is no fear of failing, but only the fear of not doing our best. That means sticking your neck out when you know that is the right thing to do.

I saw a lot of that this session: very hard and determined work, regardless of the outcome.

And so I say with pride, based on not only our collective accomplishments but our collective efforts: I am honored to have served as your speaker, and I look forward to working with you again next session.

Thank you and aloha.

House Adjourns 2015 Regular Session

The House of Representatives adjourn the 2015 regular session, which provided the opportunity for the House, together with the Senate, to pass some landmark legislation over gnarly issues that in one instance go back 15 years.

During the session, the House approved a five-year extension of Oahu’s rail tax surcharge, provided funding to purchase and preserve lands at Turtle Bay, created a mechanism to allow Maui’s public hospitals to pursue public-private partnerships, and provided for the establishment of medical marijuana dispensaries throughout the state.

“From our transportation infrastructure to healthcare, you took on the challenges, even when there seemed to be little hope for success,” House Speaker Joseph M. Souki (Kahakuloa, Waihee, Waiehu, Puuohala, Wailuku, Waikapu) told state representatives in his closing remarks.

“Building Honolulu’s rail system has been frustrating. The little distance traveled for the price seems high indeed. But the cost for not taking this first step is even higher and future generations will thank you for your far sightedness and courage,” he said.

Souki thanked House members for thinking “outside the box” in resolving Maui hospital’s financial crisis and for working collaboratively with the Administration and Senate on Maui Hospital and a range of other measures.

“Good solutions are always collaborative and identified, not by one person’s signature, but by many fingerprints,” Souki said. “Together with the Governor, we’ve come up with a fair resolution for all concerned, including the people of Maui.”

On finalizing the purchase of North Shore lands for preservation, Souki said:

“You also took steps to complete the job of preserving the lands around Kawela Bay for future generations—a task that seemed daunting a year ago. You not only completed that job but re-fashioned a better deal that looked out for the best interest of the people of Hawaii.

“You also heard the pleas of those who depend on medical marijuana to make it through each day and provided them with legal access to dispensaries throughout the state,” he said referring to the passage of HB321, CD1, which creates a statewide distribution system for medical marijuana and establishes the parameters for individuals and entities to apply to set up the dispensaries.

The Speaker also noted that the Legislature provided more than $28 million in grant-in-aid for nonprofit organizations who reach out to the community with invaluable services and provided over $2.45 billion for a wide range of capital improvement projects, which will continue to support state services and economic growth on all islands.

In addition, he applauded the Legislature’s the fiscal restraint in CIP spending and in addressing the state’s unfunded liabilities.

“As we move further from the last economic recession, it becomes easier to slip into past practices of borrowing from the state’s Rainy Day Fund and the Hurricane Relief Fund, and spend more freely during good times. You not only refrained from that temptation but continued to address the state’s unfunded liabilities in a responsible and prudent manner,” Souki said.

“Together, with the Senate and the Ige administration, we did all this and more. We did it not to make headlines, but to make Hawaii the kind of place we are all proud to call home.”


Full text of Speaker Souki's closing remarks is available here.

Legislature Passes Bill to Establish Medical Marijuana Dispensary System


On the last day of the 2015 regular session, the House passed on final reading HB321, CD1, which creates a statewide distribution system for medical marijuana and establishes the parameters for individuals and entities to apply to set up the dispensaries.

“There are an estimated 13,000 qualifying patients throughout the state who are desperately looking to find a safe, reliable and convenient access to medical marijuana. This bill is a reasonable and compassionate response to the needs of our citizens,” said Rep. Della Au Belatti (Makiki, Tantalus, Papakolea, McCully Pawaa, Manoa), who co-introduced the bill along with House Speaker Joseph M. Souki (Kahakuloa, Waihee, Waiehu, Puuohala, Wailuku, Waikapu). Both are long-time supporters of medical marijuana dispensaries.

“While the Legislature made legal the medical use of marijuana on June 14, 2000, the law has remained silent for 15 years on how patients can obtain medical marijuana if they or their caregivers are unable to grow their own supply,” Souki added. “There has been a desperate need for a safe and reliable dispensary system statewide for medical marijuana for a long time. This bill finally answers that need.”

The measure follows closely the recommendations of the Task Force commissioned by the Legislature in 2013 to study the implementation of medical marijuana dispensaries. It also provides for opportunities to improve the system and correct any shortcomings on a go-forward basis.

The bill, which also passed the Senate, now goes to the Governor for his signature, veto or passage without his signature.

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE BILL:

  • Allows for eight (8) dispensary licensees in the state: three (3) on Oahu, two (2) on Big Island and two (2) on Maui County; one (1) on Kauai;
  • Each licensee may own, operate or subcontract up to two production centers and up to two retail dispensing locations; prohibits dispensary from being located in same place as production center;
  • Requires the Department of Health to engage in public education and training regarding medical marijuana;
  • Requires the Department of Health to adopt interim rules by Jan. 4, 2016, for the establishment and management of the medical marijuana dispensary system;
  • Tasks the Department of Health with accepting applications for dispensary licenses from Jan. 12, 2016, to Jan. 29, 2016, and announcing licensees by April 15, 2016;
  • Tasks the Department of Health to select licensees based on minimum requirements and merit based factors including: the capacity to meet the needs of patients; ability to comply with criminal background checks, inventory controls, and security requirements; ability to operate a business; and financial stability and access to financial resources;
  • Allows the Department of Health to license additional operators after Oct. 1, 2017, based on qualifying patient need;
  • Dispensaries must comply with all zoning regulations and will not be permitted within 750 ft. of a playground, public housing or school;
  • Licensees may begin dispensing marijuana and manufactured marijuana products on July 15, 2016, with the approval of the Department of Health;
  • Licensed applicants must pay (a) $5,000 non-refundable application fee, (b) an additional $75,000 fee for each license approved, and (c) a $50,000 annual renewal fee;
  • Establishes the criteria for license applications to require that an individual applicant: be a legal resident of the State for not less than five years, be over the age of 21, and have no felony convictions;
  • Establishes the minimum criteria for license applications to require that an entity applicant: be organized under the laws of the state and have a Hawaii tax ID number, have a 51 percent or greater Hawaii based ownership stake, have at least $1,000,000 under its control for each license applied for with an additional $100,000 available for each retail dispensing location;
  • Imposes regular general excise taxes onto the sale of marijuana and manufactured products within the dispensary system and does not include any additional taxes;
  • Allows qualifying patients to obtain medical marijuana from primary caregivers who cultivate or by personally cultivating marijuana until Dec. 31, 2018;
  • Allows a primary caregiver or legal guardian to cultivate marijuana after Dec. 31, 2018, if qualifying patient is a minor or adult lacking legal capacity or who is located on any island with no dispensary;
  • Expands the definition of “debilitating medical condition” for the purpose of authorizing use to include post-traumatic stress disorder;
  • Expands the Department of Health’s authority to conduct criminal background checks;
  • Requires dispensaries to allow announced and unlimited unannounced inspections and to conduct annual financial audits; and
  • Requires the Department of Health to file annual report to Governor and Legislature on dispensaries.
Additional details of the measure can be found in the bill text and the committee report at the links below:

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Governor Signs Measure to Accommodate the Deaf and Blind in Movie Theaters

A bill signed into law today by Governor David Ige will make Hawaii the first state in the nation to mandate accommodations for the hearing and visually impaired at movie theaters statewide.

HB1272 requires anyone that operates a motion picture theater in more than two locations in the state to provide open captioning during at least two showings per week of each motion picture that is produced with open movie captioning. It also requires them to provide an audio description of any motion picture that is produced and offered with audio description. The measure takes effect Jan. 1, 2016 and sunsets Jan. 1, 2018.

"This law makes Hawaii the first state in the nation to mandate broader accommodations to allow equal access to movie theaters for our deaf, blind, deaf/blind and hard-of-hearing communities," said the bill’s introducer Rep. James Tokioka (Wailua Homesteads, Hanamaulu, Lihue, Puhi, Old Koloa Town, Omao).

"In addition, it will bring Hawaii closer to achieving full inclusion for our deaf and blind communities that was first initiated with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990."

The law removes communication barriers and provides equal access to persons who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or have poor vision through reasonable accommodations at movie theaters. It will also help seniors who have trouble hearing, as well as individuals who are learning English as a second language by providing the written dialogue on screen.

Tokioka also added, “I would like to thank Governor Ige and my colleagues in both the House and Senate for their support and for recognizing the need for this law.”


State Budget Targets $172 Million for Maui Capital Improvements

Under the state budget passed by the Legislature this week, Maui representatives secured about $172 million in Capital Improvement Project (CIP) funding for various projects across Maui County.

The largest single item by far was $38 million for expansion and improvements to Kahului Harbor. Of that, $17 million will go for land acquisition and improvements to the acquired parcel and $21 million for improvements to existing facilities over the two years of the biennium. The budget also includes $10 million for the construction of a new 8 classroom building at Lahainaluna High School.

“During a period when the construction industry is doing well, it behooves the state to move prudently regarding capital improvement projects—taking care not to unintentionally drive up the cost of labor and materials by over stimulating the industry with unnecessary or untimely CIP projects,” said House Speaker Joseph M. Souki, who represents Kahakuloa, Waihee, Waiehu, Puuohala, Wailuku and Waikapu. “Having said that, there is also a balance we must seek to ensure that we do fund needed projects to maintain state services and ensure our quality of life on Maui. 


“I am grateful to my Maui colleagues—Rep. Justin Woodson, Rep. Angus McKelvey, Rep. Kaniela Ing, Rep. Lynn DeCoite, and especially to our CIP Subcommittee Chair, Kyle Yamashita—who all worked collaboratively to secure these priorities for all of Maui County.”

Here are the highlights of the CIP funding secured for Maui County:

  • $1 million for the design, construction and equipment for track and field at King Kekaulike High School
  • $500,000 for a water filtration system at Kula Elementary School
  • $10 million for the construction of a new 8 classroom building at Lahainaluna High School
  • $2 million for design and construction of a covered play court at Makawao Elementary School
  • $2 million to renovate and expand band/choir building at Maui High School
  • $2.7 million for construction of weight training and wrestling rooms at Maui High School
  • $215,000 to replace and expand the gymnasium floor at Maui High School
  • $362,000 for landscaping at Pukalani Elementary School
  • $900,000 design and construction for a new administration building at Waihee Elementary School
  • $2.25 million for emergency dredging and replacement of buoys at Lahaina Small Boat Harbor
  • $6 million for construction of a regional park for central Maui
  • $4 million for construction of a Maui office and annex building to support various state departmental divisions and programs
  • $500,000 for plans and designs for a Kahoolawe education center in South Maui
  • $2 million for improvement to Maui Raceway Park
  • $3.3 million for replacement of the sewage lift/pump station at Kahului Aiport
  • $7.5 million for the renovations of restrooms at Kahului Airport
  • $8.8 million for the design and construction of various projects at Kahului Airport including a holdroom, security pass, ID office improvements, and a new conference room
  • $33.579 million for a new aircraft rescue and firefighting station and other related improvements at Hana Airport
  • $38 million expansion and improvements to Kahului Harbor
  • $1.8 million to widen a portion of Haleakala Highway from one lanes to two lanes
  • $4 million for safety improvements to Hana Highway along Route 360, from Huelo to Hana
  • $895,000 for roadway widening and realignment on Hana Highway in the vicinity of mile post 28.1
  • $4.6 million for the design and construction to mitigate rockfalls and potential landslides along the slopes of Route 360 on Hana Highway
  • $1.05 million for the beautification of the main corridor between Kahului and Wailuku along the Hana Highway
  • $8.5 million for the next phase of the Lahaina bypass road construction
  • $650,000 for the design of Kahului Baseyard improvements
  • $300,000 for a Paia bypass traffic alternative 
  • $2,000,000 to replace chillers and AC equipment at Maui Memorial Hospital
  • $1,000,000 for renovations and repairs at Maui Memorial Hospital
  • $400,000 for the purchase of clinical equipment at Maui Memorial Hospital 
  •  $2,592,000 for plumping and fire safety upgrades at Maui Memorial Hospital
  • $400,000 for air conditioner improvements at Kula Hospital
  • $2,000,000 for exterior and ward room repairs at Kula Hospital
  • $500,000 to improve energy efficiency at Kula Hospital
  • $1,000,000 for plumping and facility improvements at Lanai Community Hospital
  •  $500,000 to Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc. for the construction of a new administration facility (Grant-in-Aid)
  •  $300,000 to Heritage Hall, Inc. for the construction of incorporated facilities in Paia (Grant-in-Aid)
  •          $500,000 to Hana Health for the construction of new facilities (Grant-in-Aid)


Funding highlights for Molokai:
  • $3.5 million for the renovation of the gym/emergency shelter at Molokai High School
  • $3.5 million for renovation of the gym/emergency shelter at Molokai High School
  • $3.5 million to replace the Makakupaia Stream Bridge along Kamehameha V Highway
  • $1.2 million for the design and construction for improvements to the Molokai irrigation system
  • $3.2 million for improvements to Molokai Airport
  • $500,000 to Kalamaula Homesteaders Association for the redevelopment of Kiowea Park facilities (Grant-in-Aid)
Funding highlights for Lanai:
  • $1.5 million for construction of airport road and other improvements to Lanai Airport
 ###

Contact Information:
Joseph M. Souki (District 8: Kahakuloa, Waihee, Waiehu, Puuohala, Wailuku, Waikapu)
(808) 586-6100
repsouki@capitol.hawaii.gov

Justin H. Woodson (District 9: Kahului, Puunene, Old Sand Hills, Maui Lani)
(808) 586-6210
repwoodson@capitol.hawaii.gov

Angus McKelvey (District 10: West Maui, Maalaea, North Kihei)
(808) 586-6160
repmckelvey@capitol.hawaii.gov

Kaniela Ing (District 11: Kihei, Wailea, Makena)
(808) 586-8525
reping@capitol.hawaii.gov

Kyle T. Yamashita (District 12: Sprecklesville, Pukalani, Makawao, Kula, Keokea, Ulupalakua, Kahului)
(808) 586-6330
repyamashita@capitol.hawaii.gov

Lynn DeCoite (District 13, Haiku, Hana, Kaupo, Kipahulu, Nahiku, Paia, Kahoolawe, Lanai, Moloka'i, Molokini)
(808) 586-6790
repdecoite@capitol.hawaii.gov